Painted Furniture

My New Favorite Paint

Chalk paint has been all the rage for a while now, but I’ve really only used a few kinds. I’ve always been tempted toward Annie Sloan Chalk Paint, but I don’t have a source close by. I could order it, but when inspiration strikes, I want it, like, yesterday. I really enjoyed using CeCe Caldwell Paints (CCP) until my local source stopped carrying it. I painted a dining table with it about 4 years ago and coated it with Polycrylic. My girls now use it as their school and craft table–meaning it has been glued, glittered, and abused since then. (Here is the link to the original project.) I still love everything about this table from the style to the distressing to the color–Young Kansas Wheat. Here it is today. I try to stay out of the girls’ craft zone, so I typically just see the table from this side which still looks good. (As soon as the camera comes out, Steve just has to be right in the action. Say hi, Steve!)

And this is why I don’t get too close to the table anymore. Many a Littlest Pet Shop critter has been modified at this very spot. (Or spots?) This table wears these badges of life well. Every spot, sparkle, gouge, and smear tells my girls’ creative story. I love it very much. 

When I couldn’t get CCP locally anymore, I started making my own chalk paint with Plaster of Paris and latex paint. Homemade chalk paint might work for the brave, talented few, but no. Just don’t do it.

Here’s why:

I searched the interwebs for coffee bar ideas for my new kitchen. I found a beautiful inspiration photo, and matched it with a vintage buffet that I had been using as an entertainment center. I had painted the buffet in a soft blue-green a few years ago, but I wanted a bolder blue color. I whipped up a batch of homemade chalk paint using Bermuda Blue paint and Plaster of Paris.

Worst. Decision. Ever.

Imagine this entire buffet coated in a thick layer of bright blue goo. Textured goo. <shiver> I was working out on the front porch in the summer heat, and wouldn’t you know it–that paint mixture dried like concrete.

So, I started stripping. Right there on the porch.

Many hours of stripping and sanding later, I was skeert to paint that buffet again. But I did! Ta-Da!

I used Amy Howard At Home One Step Paint that I conveniently bought at my local Ace Hardware. It is everything it says it is. One step. No top coat needed. It can be tinted to any color you can image right there at Ace! The paint dries to a smooth finish with very few visible brush strokes. (I’m sure a light sanding would knock those down, but I personally like to see them in hand painted furniture so I don’t bother.) The final product looks and feels like a lightly waxed, chalk painted piece–not shiny, just a soft and lovely finish. This piece has had months of daily use in my kitchen, and I am pleased to say that it looks just as good now as it did when I painted it.

So, I used One Step Paint again on my bargain dining room table. As a side note, I love a good Home Decorators Collection clearance sale. They were clearing out their Provence Dining Table and offering free shipping–I got it home for under $200. I liked the original chestnut color, but the top of the table started bubbling where it was exposed to water–I think it was a very thin veneer over MDF. I scraped down the raised areas and knew I needed to paint the table to seal it from more damage. I still had half a can of One Step Paint left from the buffet project (this stuff goes a long way!) and here it is!

Go get some of this paint and make something beautiful! Be sure to post a link or a pic of your creation in the comments!

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OPP: Other People's Paint

Metamorphosis

It’s finally spring. I think. Maybe.

I love spring! Spring changes the landscape, gives new life, longer days, and softer nights. Spring starts out slowly, then BAM! It is alive with color and bird song.

That is how this house has been. We are coming up on three (THREE!) years here. Change came slowly, then BAM! Here we are! We’ve completed several major projects: the roof, the boiler, the AC, repainted the exterior trim, added a bathroom, converted a workroom into our master bedroom, and renovated the kitchen. As much as I love my new kitchen, I think the new roof and repainted exterior trim has made me the happiest.

Some people might be Down With OPP (Other People’s Paint), but I am not. Sometimes I’m not even down with my own paint choices. Such is the life of a habitual repainter. (Bunny Trail Moment: I’ll be sharing some of my favorite smaller paint projects soon. While you wait, make sure you get a can or two of Amy Howard At Home One Step Paint from Ace Hardware. When you see what this paint can do, you’ll want to dive in to your own projects–so be prepared!)

Now back to our regularly scheduled programming.

Nothing makes me happier than fixing OPP. The previous owner painted the trim navy blue shortly before we bought the house. Yeah. Navy trim on a blue-green house. (At least the navy was was better than the bright yellow trim color that we found under it!) Our neighbor recently confessed that she thought the navy trim made it look like a haunted house.

It was a bit foreboding: 

After a new roof and white trim paint, it is a whole new house. 🙂

When we bought the house, the roof was metal one that had seen better days. It wasn’t original to the house, so we felt no qualms about ripping that sucker off. Good thing we did–it was hiding quite a bit of rot, especially on this side by the tree:

The whole family took on the trim painting as our summer project. We did hire a painter to do the second and third story windows that we couldn’t reach safely. So much better!

Normally, I’m a Benjamin Moore girl, but we used Behr Premium Plus Ultra Paint +Primer exterior paint in “right off the shelf” white. Amazing paint. It took between 2 to 2.5 coats to cover the navy, far fewer coats than I anticipated. Our contractor also used this line of paint for the trim in our new bathroom–I think this will be my go-to trim paint from here on out.

As you can see, the greatest changes in this house came from a humble can of paint. (Many cans, actually.) We knew the bones of this house were good, even if the paint choices were questionable.  Nothing that more paint and a little elbow grease can’t fix!

Let’s see what other changes this spring will bring! It’s good to be home.